Bible Reading and Commentary July 18-23, 2016

Bible Reading and Commentary
July 18-23, 2016

Monday, July 18, II Corinthians 7
v. 10 — Paul reminds the Corinthian Christians and us what produces true repentance. It isn’t the kind of sorrow the world shows when they do something wrong and are caught. Their sorrow is self-centered. They feel sorry for themselves. True repentance begins with godly sorrow. This means we are truly sorry for what we did wrong. We want to rectify the wrong and above all, we want God’s forgiveness. We believe in Jesus and in Him we have that forgiveness.

Tuesday, July 19, II Corinthians 8
v. 7— God wants us to abound in all the gifts and abilities He gives us. That includes the gift of giving. do, we glorify Him and thank Him for all His gracious blessings. We certainly want to do that. The reason we do is in this magnificent promise of God. Think about it: “For you know the grace of our Lord Jesus Christ, that though He was rich, yet for your sakes He became poor, so that you through His poverty might become rich.” (v. 9) Those riches are freedom from sin and everlasting life. We, therefore, don’t use gimmicks, but Gospel motivation alone for giving to the Lord.

Wednesday, July 20, II Corinthians 9
Vv. 6-10 — The gift of money Paul is talking about in v. 5 was the collection for the needy Christians in Jerusalem. The kind of givers we all are to be is described in v. 7, “God loves a CHEERFUL giver.” Our motivation for such giving is in vv. 6, 8, and especially v. 15.
v. 12 — While we put a check in our “Mission” envelope and get the canceled check back from the bank, we never see the smile that perhaps lights the face of someone whose heart was touched by the grace of God in Jesus Christ through that offering.

Thursday, July 21, II Corinthians 10
Vv. 12, 17, 18 — The difference between a true and a false shepherd is, as Paul points out to the Corinthians, that a false shepherd boasts in himself. He measures himself by himself. A true shepherd’s boast is in the Lord. Such shepherds the Lord commends and approves of.
Friday, July 22, II Corinthians 11
v. 28 — Paul took his ministry seriously and it weighed on his heart and mind. That is true of faithful pastors and teachers today. Remember them in your prayers.
v. 30 — While the super-apostles boasted in their false message of salvation (vv. 4, 5, 13-15), Paul boasted in his weakness. Because Christ strengthened him in his weakness (chap. 12:8-10), his boasting actually was in the Lord. “I can do everything through Him who gives me strength.” (Phil. 4:13)

Saturday, July 23, II Corinthians 12-13
Chap. 12:2 — Could this third heaven be the place of God’s abode beyond our solar system (the galaxies)? In connection with this, read also Eph. 4:10.
Chap. 12:4 — The Greek word for “Paradise” meant a beautiful park. It’s the same Greek word used to describe Paradise in Gen. 2:8. Could this mean that our life in heaven will be lived in the type of Paradise that Adam and Eve enjoyed before they fell into sin?
Chap. 12:7 — We don’t know for sure what Paul’s “thorn in the flesh” was. Some suggest he suffered from vision problems based on Gal. 6:11, “See what large letters I use as I write to you.”
Chap. 12:9 — This is a good verse to underline and memorize because we all have times in life when we feel weak and it’s only by the grace of God that we stand secure. This verse becomes much more “real” to us when we climb the mountain of adversity. We realize what Paul concluded in vv. 9-10:”…For when I am weak, then I am strong.”
Chap. 13:5 — How do we examine ourselves to see whether we are in faith? We should look at our lives as Christians and answer these questions positively:
1) Are the fruits of faith in Gal. 5:22,23 evident in my life?
2) Is God’s Word a lamp to my feet and a light for my path? (Ps. 119:105)
3) Do I avoid the life of the ungodly?
4) Do I believe Jesus is the Way, the Truth, and Eternal Life?(John 14:6)
Chap. 13:14 — This is the Apostolic Blessing. It’s often used to close our Matins and Vespers services. Underline this passage.

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